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Thursday 19 October 2017
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The Force is strong with these hand-painted, laser-shooting ‘Star Wars’ drones

The Force is strong with these hand-painted, laser-shooting ‘Star Wars’ drones

More Star Wars drones are coming.

 

Air Hogs’s Millennium Falcon drone was pretty sweet, but undeniably… uh… foamy. (It isdesigned to be kid safe after all). 

At Star Wars Celebration in London last week, Propel announced its own lineup of drones based off of vehicles from the Star Wars universe and they look AH-MAZE-ING. Not only are they fast drones, but they also shoot lasers for real aerial battles with each other. Unreal.

Four highly detailed (hand-painted) drones were shown off, including an X-Wing, Millennium Falcon, TIE Fighter and a 74-Z speeder bike used by the Imperial Army during the Battle of Endor.

 

IMAGE: PROPEL

 

IMAGE: PROPEL

 

IMAGE: PROPEL

 

IMAGE: PROPEL

The drones sport four propellers positioned below the body as opposed to above. Propel says the different placement of the blades allows them to appear invisible in the air, and also helps create more downward thrust that allows them to max out at speeds of 40 mph. The Millennium Falcon drone can reportedly fly at 50 mph — because it has to be the fastest if it’s going to make the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs.

As mentioned earlier, the drones can fire lasers, and up to 24 drones can dogfight in the air with each other.

Additionally, the drones can perform mid-air stunts like backflips and 360-degree rotations with a single button push on the remote control.

Fans can pre-order the drones from Propel’s website for shipping by the end of the year. North Americans will have to wait a little longer, though, as it’s not available in the region yet. 

The drones will cost $200-$300 depending on the model and only 10,000-15,000 units per model will be produced, according to IGN.

You can find more hands-on photos of the drones on Propel’s Facebook page here.

 

IMAGE: PROPEL

 

IMAGE: PROPEL

 

IMAGE: PROPEL

 

IMAGE: PROPEL

 

IMAGE: PROPEL

 

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